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A View from Here: Northwest Coast Native Arts



EXTENDED THROUGH APRIL &, 2017!
The Ralph T. Coe Foundation for the Arts is pleased to present A View from Here: Northwest Coast Native Arts. This exhibition gathers exquisite carvings and prints from the collection of Richard and Joan Chodosh. Including works from some of the region's most influential artists, "A View from Here: Northwest Coast Native Arts," provides a unique occasion for the public to engage with arts rarely seen in New Mexico.

Far from the bright sun and high-desert landscape of Santa Fe, Northwest Coast artists create works driven by a cultural heritage deeply rooted in the sea, the rivers, and the forests. The resulting objects represent a complex visual language meant to express relationships of people, oral traditions, and land and sea, through abstracted, flowing, continuous lines. In two-dimensional design and rich carvings, Northwest Coast artists create work that speaks of the inter-changeability of the natural and super-natural worlds as expressed through the movement of dance and ritual and inherited visual forms passed down through the generations.

The objects to be exhibited at the Coe Foundation in A View from Here: Northwest Coast Native Arts express a form of cultural agency, defiance, and self-preservation, as the represented artists all work to create formal continuity with a past that faced severe restrictions and violent suppression. Artists such as Bill Reid, David Boxley, Beau Dick, Dempsey Bob, and the Hunt family, among others, were leaders active in the resurgence of Northwest Coast art and other traditions, including most significantly potlaches, which were long banned in the region. As Richard Hunt (Kwa-Guilth) explains, "It is a great way to go through life, loving what you do for a living and owning the culture that belongs to you." The power of that cultural ownership is apparent is every chisel stroke and surface detail of the works gathered in this exhibition.

This opportunity to view such works, alongside the Coe Foundation's own diverse collection of historic and contemporary material from across North America and beyond, expands the conversation around Native American art in Santa Fe.

The exhibition opens August 12, 3-6 pm. Due to public interest, the exhibition has been extended through April 7, 2017 at the Coe Foundation, 1590 B Pacheco Street. At the Foundation visitors may also view the unique 2000 piece Coe collection, featuring indigenous art from throughout the world, emphasizing the historic and contemporary arts of North America's First peoples. The Foundation is open every first Friday of the month as well as by appointment.

Tony Hunt, Jr., Kwagiult Thunderbird Frontlet, 1988.


Richard and Joan Chodosh have been collecting Northwest Coast art from artists and galleries for over forty years. The cultural meaning of the works continues to inspire and influence the Chodosh's selection, as well as their continued admiration for the people and arts of the Pacific coast. The collection spans the time period of great revival and resurgence of Northwest Coast First Nations ceremonialism that for three generations had been suppressed and legislated against in Canada. The Chodoshs are fortunate to include pieces in their collections from revival leadership, including Bill Reid, David Boxley, Beau Dick, Glen Rabena, and David Neel.